Welcome to Evently

Lorem ipsum proin gravida nibh vel veali quetean sollic lorem quis bibendum nibh vel velit.

Evently

Stay Connected & Follow us

Simply enter your keyword and we will help you find what you need.

What are you looking for?

Good things happen when you narrow your focus
Welcome to Conference

Write us on info@evently.com

Follow Us

Cassini’s 20 Years of Discovery

After two decades in space, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft ended its remarkable journey of exploration in 2017. Having expended almost every bit of the rocket propellant it carried to Saturn, operators deliberately plunged Cassini into the planet to ensure Saturn’s moons remain pristine for future exploration—in particular, the ice-covered, ocean-bearing moon Enceladus, but also Titan, with its intriguing pre-biotic chemistry.

Beginning in 2010, Cassini began a seven-year mission extension in which it completed many moon flybys while observing seasonal changes on Saturn and Titan. The plan for this phase of the mission was to expend all of the spacecraft’s propellant while exploring Saturn, ending with a plunge into the planet’s atmosphere. In April 2017, Cassini was placed on an impact course that unfolded over five months of daring dives—a series of 22 orbits that each passed between the planet and its rings. Called the Grand Finale, this final phase of the mission brought unparalleled observations of the planet and its rings from closer than ever before.

On Sept. 15, 2017, the spacecraft made its final approach to the giant planet Saturn. But this encounter was like no other. This time, Cassini dived into the planet’s atmosphere, sending science data for as long as its small thrusters could keep the spacecraft’s antenna pointed at Earth. Soon after, Cassini burned up and disintegrated like a meteor.

To its very end, Cassini was a mission of thrilling exploration. Launched on Oct. 15, 1997, the mission entered orbit around Saturn on June 30, 2004 (PDT), carrying the European Huygens probe. After its four-year prime mission, Cassini’s tour was extended twice. Its key discoveries included the global ocean with indications of hydrothermal activity within Enceladus, and liquid methane seas on Titan.

Cassini may be gone, its enormous collection of data about Saturn—the giant planet itself, its magnetosphere, rings and moons—will continue to yield new discoveries for decades. Senior members of the Cassini team from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory will receive the NSS’s Space Pioneer Award at the 2018 International Space Development Conference on Friday, May 25. Be sure to sign up now for lunch tickets to attend this event.

%d bloggers like this: